Chandrayaan 2: Nasa to share images of Vikram's moon landing site with ISRO

Nasa will share before and after images of Chandrayaan -2 Vikram lander to support analysis by the Indian Space Research Organization.

Chandrayaan 2: Nasa to share images of Vikram's moon landing site with ISRO
Nasa to share images of Vikram's moon landing site with ISRO.

Nasa said that it would share 'before and after' images of the location where Chandrayaan 2's lander, which made a hard landing early on 7th September.

According to a report a statement by Nasa Readed 'NASA will share any before and after flyover imagery of the area around the targeted Chandrayaan-2 Vikram Lander landing site to support analysis by the Indian Space Research Organization.

The Indian Deep Space Network (IDSN) antennas are being used by ISRO at Bylalu near Bengaluru to communicate with the lander where as NASA is using The Deep Space Network (DSN) is sending radio signals in the hope of re-establishing communication with the lander.

Nasa is also trying to contact with Vikram which has not transmitted, any signal from 7th September. 

Scott Tilley,an astronomer who who was also the part of the missing American weather satellite IMAGE in 2018 tweeted '#Chandrayaan2 and #Queqiao (Chinese spacecraft) briefly embrace before Chandrayaan 2 orbiter slip behind the Moon yet again... Meanwhile the DSN24 continues emitting its beacon in hopes #VikramLander will respond...'.

Meanwhile, Dr Nirupam Roy, who is an assistant professor of physics at the Indian Institute of Science (IISc), Bengaluru in an interview said 'These radio signals are sent in the hope of establishing some form of communication with the lander. If a communication is established, scientists will at least be able to tell what systems are working and assess what might have gone wrong during the last moments. Whether they will be able to send any commands or not, I am not sure’. 

As Vikram lander runs on solar power can go on sleep mode Isro scientists are trying to locate the lander before the lunar night [equal to 14 Earth days] begins on September 21.

Roy added by saying The location of the lander is already known from the images taken by the orbiter, but for establishing communication the lander has to be in a working condition and has to be oriented properly in two ways — the solar panel for power and the antennae for communication. From what I know, the battery backup of the lander can at best last for 14 days. In that case, all hope of establishing communication will end as the lunar night begins.

Meanwhile, Apart from the radio signal, the Nasa can also share the images from its own Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter, which will pass over the landing site of the Vikram on September 17.